Monday the 9th of September

Campylobacters without borders I
Arie Havelaar

Tuesday the 10th of September

Parallel Workshops

Campylobacters without borders II
Victoria Korolik, Christine Szymanski

H. pylori virulence factors and pathogenesis
Steffen Backert and Steve Blanke

Wednesday the 11th of September

Intervention measures along the poultry production chain
Thomas Alter – Lu Xiaonan and the European Food Safety Authority

Campylobacters without borders I and II
Victoria Korolik, Christine Szymanski, Arie Havelaar

Following Campylobacter without Borders Part I which will introduce the audience to some larger scale epidemiological, modeling and surveillance studies in low and middle income countries (LMICs), this session will begin to address some of the mechanistic details about Campylobacter infection in LMICs. Margaret Kosek will give a talk on the correlations observed in the two Gates funded studies including the high incidence, identification of non Cj/Cc Campylobacter species, lack of protection from breastfeeding, and host factors predisposing infants to higher rates of diarrheal disease. Christine Szymanski will present their findings looking at Campylobacters from breastfed infants in developing countries and how human milk oligosaccharides may act as decoys causing certain strains to swim away while others become enriched. Then Victoria Korolik will describe the various chemotaxis pathways that could in part explain Campylobacter selection. We will finish the session with selected abstract short talks describing other advances in our understanding of Campylobacter infections in LMICs, other emerging Campylobacter species, metabolic requirements, and swimming preferences that allow this organism to infect anyone without any borders.

H. pylori virulence factors and pathogenesis
Steffen Backert and Steve Blanke

 In this session, we aim to highlight progress in recent years in characterizing known virulence factorsand newly discovered factors with sophisticated molecular biological approaches to yield new insight in the functions of these critical virulence determinants. Several new aspects of Helicobacter pylori physiology were explored and evaluated for their functions during stomach colonization, including the fascinating roles for several cell surface adhesins, cag type IV secretion system, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, cholesterol glycosyltransferase or serine protease HtrA. On the cell biology side, elegant new work in the murine and gerbil model systems as well as organoid primary cell culture approaches have provided us with new insights into how H. pylori manipulates gastric tissue functions, locally and at a distance, to promote its survival in the stomach and induce pathologic changes.

Intervention measures along the poultry production chain
Thomas Alter – Lu Xiaonan and the European Food Safety Authority

The goal of the workshop is to bring together different stakeholders working on reducing the Campylobacter load in the poultry production chain (e.g. governmental agencies, poultry industry and researchers). Special focus is put on the slaughterhouse. Different options to mitigate Campylobacter during the slaughter process will be discussed (e.g. management options, technological, biological, physical and chemical intervention measures). The aim is to share the experiences from different countries and discuss successful approaches, current challenges and potential limitations.

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